Mike Welker

Three months after my discharge from the Marine Corps, at 22 years old, I met my wife Megan, on December 10th, 2002. The very next day, I was drawn like a moth to a flame into dealing with a long term, terminal illness. Megan had Cystic Fibrosis, and after 8 years or declining health, she received a double lung transplant, and a new lease o life. Our daughter Shelby was born in 2007.   In early 2014, those recycled lungs, which had brought our little family three years of uncomplicated health and happiness, finally began to give out.  She died from chronic organ transplant rejection on November 19th, 2014 while I held her hand and let her go.   I'm a single father and widower at 34 years old, and no one has published a manual for it.  I don't fit the mold, because there is no mold.  I "deal with it" through morbid humor, inappropriateness, anger, and the general vulgarity of the 22 year old me, as if I never grew up, but temper it with focus on raising a tenacious, smart, and strong woman in Shelby.  I try to live as if Megan is still here with us, giving me that sarcastic stare because yet again, I don't know what the hell I'm doing.


Go, Go, Go

In the past 30 days, we’ve had a birthday party/ family reunion, visits with friends, Sarah’s sister in town for a few days, Shelby’s best friend at the house after school for five days, a fall festival, halloween costume prep and decorations, dress fittings, tuxedo fittings, counseling appointments, extremely busy days at my work, extremely busy days with Sarah’s work, loads of homework for Shelby, Sarah’s birthday, concerts, trips to grandparents’, airport pickups, and all of the other general day-to-day minutia.

Vegetable harvesting, clothes washing, house cleaning, grocery shopping, dog walking, dish washing, dinner making and such all need to happen at least a few days a week.  Somewhere in all of it, at least a few hours of sleep need to happen.  

In the next 30 days, we have my birthday, a trip to a haunted house with one of our other widowed friends, Halloween (our favorite holiday), tuxedo pickup, a wedding rehearsal, the wedding itself, my parents’ anniversary, a trip to Canada for Camp Widow, Shelby’s 5K run, and best of all, the 3 year anniversary of Megan’s death.

 

Read more
Add your reaction Share

T.M.I.

It is very rare that one particular emotion takes the forefront of my mind for any longer than a few days.  In general, there is a veritable melting pot of thoughts occurring at any given moment, ranging from sadness to joy and everything in between.  Fear and confusion are tempered by confidence and determination.  

Of course, there are periods where certain emotions boil over and persist.  Obviously, the first few months after Megan’s death were filled with overwhelming grief.  The “busy” times of year at my work are always stressful, and it shows, even when I’m at home.  There are times when my “give-a-damn” appears to be busted, and times when worry about the future pervades.  Excitement and joy one week can easily give way to doubt and malaise the next.

Approaching three years since Megan took her last breath, I can truthfully say that I’m openly wandering.

And that’s a good thing.

 

Read more
1 reaction Share

Of the many titles I've held (Marine, Husband, Engineer, Brother, Son, Uncle), the one I am most proud of is "Father"
Donate Volunteer Membership